To Eat With Your Eyes

To Eat With Your Eyes

Interacting with food is an incredibly sensual experience. One might imagine the smell of an oven roast, or picture an oozing chocolate lava cake, maybe even hear the crunch of a stale baguette. But what happens when you lose your sense of smell and taste?

Anosmia is a disorder where one loses their ability to smell. There are various forms of this unfortunate disorder: Congenital anosmia is when someone is unable to smell at birth, and hyposmia describes the diminishing sense of smell that develops over time. Our senses of smell and taste are interdependent, so if you lose one of these senses, you lose the other one too.

From Instagram to TV ads, what’s the science behind food porn?

From Instagram to TV ads, what’s the science behind food porn?

Your brain is your body’s most blood-thirsty organ, using around 25% of total blood flow (or energy) – despite the fact that it accounts for only 2% of body mass. Given that our brains have evolved to find food, it should perhaps come as little surprise to discover that some of the largest increases in cerebral blood flow occur when a hungry brain is exposed to images of desirable foods

Application Available for 2017 Food Science Short Course in Graz, Austria

Application Available for 2017 Food Science Short Course in Graz, Austria

As part of the agreement of cooperation and exchange between the University of Arkansas Department of Food Science and the Institute of Food Analysis and Food Chemistry at Graz Technical University, a food science short course will be held in Graz, Austria, in July 2017. This is the first course which will be offered annually and will alternate between the campuses in Graz, Austria and Fayetteville. The University of Arkansas will host in 2018.

Cornell Food Science declares ‘Freedom of Peach’ delicious

Cornell Food Science declares ‘Freedom of Peach’ delicious

The team that created Freedom of Peach on stage at the annual Students in Food Science ice cream competition.

Students in Food Science 1101, in order to form a more perfect ice cream and to secure the blessings of creamy, delicious flavor, carried on an annual Cornell tradition in a contest to develop an innovative ice cream.

Freedom of Peach, inspired by peach cobbler, won this year’s competition on Nov. 30 as students were challenged to come up with an ice cream that best represented the presidential election.